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New Resources: April – June 2018

View the new resource archives.


Out of Reach: The High Cost of Housing (2018)
Out of Reach, an annual publication from the National Low Income Housing Coalition, reports on the housing wage - the hourly wage a full-time worker must earn to afford a modest rental home without spending more than 30% of his or her income on housing costs - for every state, county, and metropolitan area in the country. The report highlights the struggle faced by millions of families in affording a safe and decent home, as wages stagnate, rents increase, and the supply of affordable housing continues to be insufficient to meet the need.
Visit the Out of Reach 2018 webpage.
Visit Out of Reach webpages from previous years.
Date posted: 6/14/18

Supporting Children and Families Experiencing Homelessness
This interactive learning series from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services is intended for professionals in Head Start, Early Head Start, and child care, including early childhood and school-age child care providers, CCDF Lead Agency or designated entity staff, and other key stakeholders. Learn how to identify families experiencing homelessness, conduct community outreach, and much more.
Visit the Supporting Children and Families Experiencing Homelessness learning module webpage.
Date posted: 5/11/18

Civil Rights Data Collection (CRDC)
This U.S. Department of Education data collection reports data on key education and civil rights issues in our nation's public schools on a biennial basis. The CRDC includes data on enrollment demographics, preschool, match and science courses, Advanced Placement (AP), SAT & ACT, discipline, school expenditures, and teacher experience. New data items for the 2015-16 CRDC include math and science classes taught by certified teachers, enrollment in Algebra I in Grade 7 and Geometry in Grade 8, offenses, pre-K discipline, days missed due to suspensions, and transfers to alternate schools
Visit the CRDC webpage.
Date posted: 5/07/18

Homeless Families Research Briefs, 2014-2018
This set of research briefs from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services explores issues related to the well-being and economic self-sufficiency of families and children experiencing homelessness. The briefs are based on data collected as part of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s (HUD) Family Options Study, a multi-site random assignment experiment designed to study the impact of various housing and services interventions on homeless families. Brief topics include:
  • Child Separation among Families Experiencing Homelessness
  • Hispanic Families Experiencing Homelessness
  • Patterns of Benefit Receipt among Families who Experience Homelessness
  • Child and Partner Transitions among Families Experiencing Homelessness
  • Well-being of Young Children after Experiencing Homelessness
  • Adolescent Well-Being after Experiencing Family Homelessness
  • Are Homeless Families Connected to the Social Safety Net?
    Visit the Homeless Families Research Briefs, 2014-2018 webpage.
    Date posted: 5/02/18

  • Privacy and Data Sharing
    This webpage from the U.S. Department of Education's Privacy Technical Assistance Center (PTAC) focuses on the topic of data sharing under FERPA, including exploring best practices and legal requirements for protecting student privacy while sharing data between educational agencies, partner organizations, and other third parties
    Visit the Privacy and Data Sharing webpage.
    Date posted: 5/02/18

    Missed Opportunities: LGBTQ Youth Homelessness in America
    This brief from the Voices of Youth Count Initiative at Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago highlights research related to the specific experiences of young people who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) and face homelessness. The brief finds that, compared to heterosexual and nontransgender youth, LGBTQ youth are disproportionately represented among the nearly 4.2 million youth and young adults in America who experienced some form of homelessness during a 12-month period. They also face a higher risk of early death and other adversities. The brief also points to actionable opportunities to better meet the needs of LGBTQ young people in our collective efforts to end youth homelessness.
    Visit the Missed Opportunities: LGBTQ Youth Homelessness in America webpage.
    Date posted: 5/01/18

    Human Trafficking Prevalence and Child Welfare Risk Factors Among Homeless Youth: A Multi-City Study
    This study from The Field Center at the University of Pennsylvania examines data from a three-city study conducted as part of a larger initiative by Covenant House International to research human trafficking among homeless youth encompassing nearly 1,000 young people across 13 cities. In particular, the study examines the history of child maltreatment, out-of-home placement, and other child welfare risk factors among youth who were sex trafficked or engaged in the sex trade to survive.
    Download Human Trafficking Prevalence and Child Welfare Risk Factors Among Homeless Youth: A Multi-City Study.
    Date posted: 4/30/18

    Texas Higher Education Foster Care Liaisons: Information and Reference Guide
    Texas state law requires higher education foster care liaisons at all public post-secondary institutions in the state. This guide from the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board includes in-depth information for liaisons who have advocated for and with foster care alumni for many years and for new liaisons who are interested in developing a stronger support network at their institution. While the guide is specific to foster youth in Texas, much of the information included is applicable to unaccompanied homeless youth.
    Download Texas Higher Education Foster Care Liaisons: Information and Reference Guide.
    Date posted: 4/17/18

    Application and Verification Guide
    This guide from the U.S. Department of Education is intended for financial aid administrators and counselors who help students begin the student aid process: filing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), verifying information, and making corrections and other changes to the information reported on the FAFSA. The College Cost Reduction and Access Act of 2007 states that unaccompanied homeless youth are to be considered independent students when applying for federal financial aid for higher education. See Chapter 5 - Special Cases for specific references to unaccompanied homeless youth.
    Download the Application and Verification Guide - 2018-2019.
    Download Federal Student Aid: Application and Verification Guide (unaccompanied homeless youth excerpts highlighted; compiled by NCHE, April 2018)

    Date posted: 4/17/18

    Fostering Success in Education: National Factsheet on the Educational Outcomes of Children in Foster Care
    This publication from the Legal Center for Foster Care and Education provides a review of research, laws, and promising programs impacting the educational success of children in foster care. It consists of four sections that can individually or collectively inform advocates, policymakers, agency leaders, and other stakeholders. Sections include: 1) A brief data-at-a-glance summary about the educational outcomes of students in foster care; 2) A summary of select federal policies that support educational stability and success and increased data collection and reporting; 3) A comprehensive review of the studies and research related to the education of students in foster care; and 4) An overview of promising data-supported programs or interventions around the country designed to benefit students in foster care.
    Download Fostering Success in Education: National Factsheet on the Educational Outcomes of Children in Foster Care.
    Date posted: 4/16/18

    America's Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being, 2017
    This annual report by The Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics presents a comprehensive look at critical areas of child well-being, including key indicators in seven domains: family and social environment, economic circumstances, health care, physical environment and safety, behavior, education, and health.
    Download America's Children in Brief: Key National Indicators of Well-Being, 2017.
    Access reports from previous years.
    Date posted: 4//06/18

    Falling Through the Cracks: Graduation and Dropout Rates among Michigan’s Homeless High School Students
    This 2018 report from the University of Michigan explores high school dropout and graduation rates for Michigan students experiencing homelessness, as compared to students overall and other student subpopulations.
    Download Falling Through the Cracks: Graduation and Dropout Rates among Michigan’s Homeless High School Students.
    Date posted: 4/06/18

    Still Hungry and Homeless in College
    This April 2018 report from the Wisconsin HOPE Lab analyzes data on food and housing insecurity among college students based on a survey of more than 43,000 students at 2-year and 4-year colleges. Key findings include that 36% of university students were food insecure in the 30 days preceding the survey, 36% of university students were housing insecure in the last year, and 9% of university students were homeless in the last year.
    Download Still Hungry and Homeless in College.
    Date posted: 4/03/18

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    The National Center for Homeless Education (NCHE) is the U.S. Department of Education's technical assistance center for the federal Education for Homeless Children and Youth (EHCY) Program. NCHE is housed at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

    This website was produced with funding from the U.S. Department of Education, on contract no. ED-01-CO-0092/0001. The content of this website does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Education or the University of North Carolina at Greensboro; nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

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